20 Apr 2017

Landlords to face new energy efficiency rules

Landlords to face new energy efficiency rules

A move is being made for all privately rented homes north of the border to have to come up to a minimum standard of energy efficiency.

New proposals have been published for consultation by the Scottish Government. It is seeking views on requiring all private rented sector properties to have a minimum Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of E at a change in tenancy from 2019 – and rising to level D from 2022.

Around 28% of private rented sector properties have the lowest energy efficiency ratings of E, F and G – compared to 22% in the owner-occupied sector and 10% in the social housing sector.

Priority 

Housing Minister Kevin Stewart said the proposals would help improve the quality and standard of housing for private-sector tenants and support measures to tackle fuel poverty.

He added: "Energy efficiency is a national priority and is key to tackling fuel poverty and meeting our ambitious climate change targets.

“Private renting makes up 14% of Scotland’s homes and is an increasingly important housing option for many people in Scotland at different points in their lives. It is only fair that tenants who rent privately have access to good quality and energy-efficient homes.

“Minimum standards have a key role to play in driving improvement. 

“This consultation sets out a series of proposals which aims to balance the need to make homes more energy efficient - whilst maintaining a successful private rented sector as a housing option for many thousands of households."

Help for tenants

Lori McElroy, chair of the Existing Homes Alliance, said: "We have been urging the Scottish Government to act on fuel poverty in the private rented sector, and these proposals could spell an end to many tenants suffering from cold, draughty and expensive-to-heat homes.

"Almost one in seven Scottish residents rent privately, and the evidence shows they are in a particularly vulnerable position on this issue. Unlike social housing tenants, they have no statutory protection in this area, and in some cases they are unable to get work done themselves and may not be able to persuade their landlord to take care of it either.

"However, we know that good landlords already ensure that the properties they rent are well-insulated and affordable to live in, with many private properties already meeting the same high standards we see in the best of owner-occupied or housing association properties.

“It is unfair that these landlords have to compete with a small minority who are less concerned for their tenants' wellbeing. These proposals are therefore a golden opportunity to make a better private rented sector for future generations as well as those renting today."

The Scottish Government consultation also examines what further measures can be taken to make sure the condition of privately rented properties is at the right level.

It seeks views on making changes to the repairing standard, which would improve the safety standards and physical condition expected of properties and bring the private rented sector closer to the level required in social rented housing.

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